My Invisible Life

We Are Listening

My Invisible Life by Elizabeth Christy

dog-licking-womans-face-400x228Elizabeth Christy, a person with fibromyalgia, wrote on the blog “My Invisible Life” and put into words what most people afflicted with this disorder feel emotionally and physically.  Last month her blog post was shared on the NFMCPA Facebook page where she received over 1,000  likes on her post, along with many positive comments.  The last paragraph of her blog post is so uplifting that we are quoting it to share her hope with everyone for brighter days:
“In the end, I feel about 15% better than I did when I started treatment.  For now, I’m no longer hopeless, and not in so much pain that I can’t get out of bed.  I have a child whom I can get down on the floor to play race cars with, and I have the stamina take to occasionally take him hiking, or to Chuck-E-Cheese.  I play piano, I sew, I shop, I write a blog, and I still look cute in skinny jeans.  Best of all, there’s just enough spark in my life that I feel quite genuinely happy a good deal of the time.  I may have one of the most horrible, painful, un-sung and invisible diseases that has been bestowed upon man (well, mostly women) kind, but I have my wonderful doctor, my family, and I’ve still got my spark.   I have been living with this disease, among other autoimmune problems, for about 6 years, and I will be living with it until the end of my days.  But, life is good, truly and honestly, it is good.”


Some of the comments left regarding Elizabeth’s post include:
Eva L. McAnulty:  Thank you, I couldn’t have said it any better.  When you say you have FM and people look at you they think, “oh yeah; something else now for attention.”  So thank you.
Rebecca Smith:  Wow, feels good to hear that someone else understands what life is like while the rest of the world looks at me like, ‘What is your problem, woman’. It’s not ME, it’s my fibro!
Clariza Barron:  Thank you for sharing.  I am 35 and I, too, am one of the “lucky few.”  I’ve been living with FM symptoms for 10+ years, but was only diagnosed a little over a year ago.  The daily struggle is so hard to put into words and is indeed invisible.  I am also very thankful for my wonderful husband.


We Are Listening My Invisible Life by Elizabeth Christy


Elizabeth Christy, a person with fibromyalgia, wrote on the blog “My Invisible Life” and put into words what most people afflicted with this disorder feel emotionally and physically.  Last month her blog post was shared on the NFMCPA Facebook page where she received over 1,000  likes on her post, along with many positive comments.  The last paragraph of her blog post is so uplifting that we are quoting it to share her hope with everyone for brighter days:


“In the end, I feel about 15% better than I did when I started treatment.  For now, I’m no longer hopeless, and not in so much pain that I can’t get out of bed.  I have a child whom I can get down on the floor to play race cars with, and I have the stamina take to occasionally take him hiking, or to Chuck-E-Cheese.  I play piano, I sew, I shop, I write a blog, and I still look cute in skinny jeans.  Best of all, there’s just enough spark in my life that I feel quite genuinely happy a good deal of the time.  I may have one of the most horrible, painful, un-sung and invisible diseases that has been bestowed upon man (well, mostly women) kind, but I have my wonderful doctor, my family, and I’ve still got my spark.   I have been living with this disease, among other autoimmune problems, for about 6 years, and I will be living with it until the end of my days.  But, life is good, truly and honestly, it is good.”


Some of the comments left regarding Elizabeth’s post include:


Eva L. McAnulty:  Thank you, I couldn’t have said it any better.  When you say you have FM and people look at you they think, “oh yeah; something else now for attention.”  So thank you.
Rebecca Smith:  Wow, feels good to hear that someone else understands what life is like while the rest of the world looks at me like, ‘What is your problem, woman’. It’s not ME, it’s my fibro!
Clariza Barron:  Thank you for sharing.  I am 35 and I, too, am one of the “lucky few.”  I’ve been living with FM symptoms for 10+ years, but was only diagnosed a little over a year ago.  The daily struggle is so hard to put into words and is indeed invisible.  I am also very thankful for my wonderful husband.

EV SSL